Swiss Post’s voting system put through its paces by hackers

Swiss Post will be subjecting its e-voting system to a public hacker test from 25 February to 24 March 2019. This will fulfil the directives issued by the Swiss Confederation and cantons. The test – known as an intrusion test – will allow registered IT specialists to put the system through its paces by attempting to manipulate the result of a fictitious ballot contest. Swiss Post will incorporate the results of the hacker test into the development of its e-voting system. Swiss Post publishes today the source code to its system, which independent experts can scrutinize to prepare thoroughly for the intrusion test. This rare approach is not causing any sleepless nights for Denis Morel, Head of E-voting at Swiss Post, as he reveals in our interview. But he is always curious about the creativity and sophistication of highly specialized hackers.

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New Mail Order Regulation: an overview of the most important changes for Swiss consumers

Whether from the sofa, commuting on the train or during lunch breaks, more and more people in Switzerland are buying goods online from around the world and having them delivered conveniently to their home. The new “Federal Tax Administration (FTA) Mail Order Regulation” for international consignments came into force on 1 January 2019 – and has resulted in lots of questions for Swiss Post.

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From Thun to Mürren – a Christmas parcel sets off on a journey

“Black Friday” and “Cyber Week” brought a first flood of parcels with record volumes for Swiss Post. During this period, Swiss Post handled around one third more shipments than it normally would in its three parcel centers. But what happens to a parcel after a customer drops it off at the Swiss Post counter? Barbara Schluchter-Donski from the newspaper “Thuner Tagblatt” wanted to find out more, so she sent a Christmas parcel on a journey through the yellow world from Thun to Mürren. Curious children were waiting for the red parcel at its destination, a village at 1,650 metres above sea level in the Bernese Oberland.

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